Paystack and her customer: Why users need to understand companies terms and condition

Suddenly Paystak was trending on Twitter and guess what it was a thread between them and a customer who claimed they alleged her of selling “body parts.” 

As we all know Twitter micro-blogging site to be a place of both usual and unusual trends of all sort happens, even well-known people like The Senior Special Assistant to the governor on News media, Gawat Jubril, goes to the platform to make thread happen.

It happened a few days ago when Paystack, a Nigerian fintech startup, started trending on Twitter, after a user called them out, probably to boycott the company.

On August 17, @obidi__, a Twitter user, announced that she was organizing a private birthday party for herself in Abuja, Nigeria slated to be on August 22. Obidi also mentioned it was going to be a premium party, like I’ve not heard about that before.

In the following day, she tweeted that the payment platform she intended to use was Paystack and for some reason, the company blocked her birthday party because she was ‘selling body parts’, sounds crazy right?, now I’m seeing the reason they’ve trended. See the thread;

https://twitter.com/obidi___/status/1295812333512675328

According to an email Paystact sent her, the company said that while reviewing @obidi__’s business on the platform, they realized that it involved sexual activities; figured out to be, an orgy.

With that, we’re able to deduce that that Paystack had disabled her account, but for another reason. She didn’t adhere to a different part of the company’s Acceptable Use Policy.

See why users need to read and understand terms and policies of every platform to use

As far as Paystack mail to her is concern, see an excerpt; “We would like to draw your attention to Section 2 of Paystack’s Acceptable Use Policy, which states that Paystack may not be used in connection with any product, service, transaction or activity that relates to the sale and/or purchase of certain sexually oriented materials or services,” an excerpt from the email read.

Wait let us help you understand what an Orgy is. See Wikipedia’s definition: “An orgy is a sex party consisting of at least five members where guests freely engage in open and unrestrained sexual activity or group sex.” Meanwhile, an orgy is part of Paystack’s “sexually-oriented services” which they do not support.

The Guardian already made research that shows about 7% of individuals online read the entire terms and condition documents including me. And about 20% of people have suffered in one way or another by not reading them.

See why it’s important to read a company’s terms and conditions

Obidi was trying to use Paystack in with one of the many business categories the company said it wasn’t going to permit in its Terms and Conditions. And as stated in its “Actions by Paystack” segment, the company suspended her use of Paystack’s Services.

So, therefore, other risks come with Paystack doing business with the type of companies listed on its “Certain Business Categories” segment. 

For more enlightenment, another Twitter user pointed out, other payment companies, and use Stripe who’s said to have meaner policies as an example. See his tweet;

This shows “Why some businesses aren’t allowed” page, asides illegal, shady, money-laundering businesses, Stripe doesn’t allow regulated businesses that trade alcohol or pharmaceutical products and financially risky businesses like concert pre-sales and airline tickets for that matter.
I think this is reasonable enough to judge Paystack, Stripe doesn’t support businesses that pose a brand risk like pornography and sex toy shops too.

In conclusion, even if  most terms and conditions are incredibly long and hard to read, situations like this Paystack-orgy saga will remind us all of their importance, and why they needed to be reviewed well.

In other words, accepting terms and conditions whenever downloading an app, accessing a service, registering on a website, is legally binding. This saga will give us reasons we need to spend some time reading them before going forward.

Oluwalonii Mercien

Endlessly developing solutions in tech, fintech, and African startups.

We love comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.